My Love for Real Books (over E-Books) is Now Backed by Science!

books
I’m back talking about books again. Did you catch my recently read reviews earlier this week?

Fact: I always prefer to read real books, you know, the kind printed on paper that you hold in your hand. I’m really against e-readers and I’m not budging. Go ahead, call me a Grandma. I get all the perks and bonuses of reading on a Kindle or a Nook like the books costs less money, you can often find the books for free, they don’t take up space in your home, and they are lighter to carry and travel with. 

But to me, nothing can replace the feel of holding that book in your hand, smelling the book, and turning those crisp pages. It’s an intimate experience and my thoughts begin to live within those words in their own little world in that book. 

I also don’t like the idea of relying on technology to read. If your e-reader breaks or your run out of batteries while traveling somewhere you cannot recharge, you are out of luck. 

I own hundreds of books, and yes, they are a pain to pack and move, and yes they take up a lot of space. But I love glancing over at the familiar titles and spines in my living room. You can’t replace picking up a copy of a well-loved book and flipping to one of your favorite paragraphs and reliving that experience over again. I look at my books as artwork or a collection, something to display. 

My family and my friends have tried to sway me to the dark side. My mom and I used to regularly swap books back and forth and now we can’t because she has a kindle. Friends who know I’m on a budget don’t understand why I’d want to pay MORE for books and others can’t see the need for owning so many physical books that “may” never be read again.

Finally I have a scientific reason to back up my love for reading and owning actual books as opposed to e-readers! 

This article states facts from studies and research that show that real books are better for us than e-books, and not just for the sentimental reasons most of us value. 

A brief summary:

Researchers are learning that real books help readers in many ways that the modern technology of e-readers simply cannot. 

Real books help us with:

Comprehension: A lead researcher at Norway’s Stavanger University has concluded “the haptic and tactile feedback of a Kindle does not provide the same support for mental reconstruction of a story as a print pocket-book does.” With less of a sensory relationship, readers brains aren’t fully “committed” to the digital words on the screen like they would to printed words as well as reducing their long-term memory of the words. 

Focus: When we read on a screen we are more apt to skim the words. Admit it, you do it. You probably did it with this blog post. I do it too. When reading a printed book, we read in a linear fashion. On screen, researchers are learning that we read in a F pattern. We start out reading it all but then skim more and more the further down the page we go. Even if you don’t plan on skimming a book, your mind is so used to doing so on screens all day that when you sit down to read at night you find it hard to become engaged in a novel

Less Stress: Studies show that reading for just 6 minutes a day is enough to reduce your stress level. However, our addiction to screens and the need to be plugged in 24/7 make it hard to drop everything and truly immerse yourself to book. Reading on an e-reader that is also connected to modern technology makes it harder to simply only thinking about the book you are reading. It’s easy to be distracted. 

Empathy: We all know that reader makes us emphatic to others. Common sense right? Now studies are showing that readers who read an upsetting story on an e-reader are less emphatic than those who read a book. Can’t help but see how all the above is related to that test. 

More Sleep: You should not be viewing your phone, iPad, or TV for at least 30 minutes before you go to sleep. The lights affect your brain and sleeping pattern. Same goes for reading on an e-reader right before bed. Reading right before sleep is one of the only ways I can fall asleep easily, not about to give that up!

What do you think? Do you think e-readers are changing the way we interpret the written word? Are you a lover of books like me? Are you a die-hard e-reader? 

 

 

 

The Last First Day of School

Today is a big one. Today is Ryan’s LAST first day of school!

While all the mom’s were posting pictures of their cute kids headed off to their first day of school today, I couldn’t resist posting Ryan headed off to his first day of his last year of law school. Hallelujah!

ryanfirstday
The last year. Still letting that sink in.

So begins another year of only seeing him on the weekends. Of being a constant cheerleader and a wizard-like budget maker.

 

When you’re in the depths of law school, with an overly anxious student that also works a full-time job and adds on Moot Court, and research and TA positions, and law journal, you think law school is going to last your entire life. It’s easy to get lost in the darkness and forget that this is going to just be a short period of your life. 

I’ve written about being married to a law student here and here. It’s tough. Many people are telling us these will probably be the toughest years of our lives. There’s still a lot of unchartered territory ahead. Two semesters, bar exam prep, taking the bar exam, and finding a job. 

As a couple, I think our biggest anxiety comes from the unknown. We are stuck in this “in between” patch of our lives. We have no clue where we will be living next year. Where he will get a job. How we will be paying off the excruciating amount of student loans. We’ve put things off. In our home, the phrase “After law school” is used as commonly as “coffee”. 

We made the most of this summer. Worries were but aside as much as possible and we unplugged and made each other a priority.

This past weekend you would think we’d do something fun and exciting to celebrate our last few days of freedom. No, we were out running errands, buying new shoes, hitting up Costco, and doing laundry, cooking meals for the week, and cleaning. Boring old married stuff. But I cherish doing those every day things with Ryan.

People warned me about marrying a law student. They said that the marriage would come second. That many marriages barely make it.

But I can’t imagine married life any other way. This is all I know. We’re a team. I’m happy to be married to a man who is passionate about his dream and is still supportive of mine. I don’t know how Ryan does it, how he slaves away at his job and also manages to put 100% into law school and still get amazing grades and accomplishment. Yes, I’m bragging. 

Sure I dream of the day when Ryan can come home at a reasonable hour, when we won’t be stressing about every bill, and when Ryan will be fulfilled in a career that he has worked hard for. But,  I like to think that these stressful days of pinching pennies, of saying yes to another dinner in while watching Netflix and no to a Saturday night out, of making the most of our time together will only strengthen our marriage. As cheesy as it sounds, love does win sometimes. 

I just need to remember that in the coming weeks when I’m feeling lonely and lost and like no amount of love can diminish Ryan’s stress and anxiety and like the days are longer than the weeks. We’ve got this! We’ve got this! We’ve got this! 

xoxo Katie

Illiteracy in the U.S. and the Impact of Reading

beach1

I can’t imagine a world without books. Reading is the fuel for my heart and my brain. It provides me with so much joy, knowledge, and feelings of calmness. I believe not being able to read would leave me feeling displaced – as if I suddenly lost one of my five senses.

I love that I am instantly transported to a different world where I get to live in someone else’s shoes, discover a different culture, religion, point of view, or time period. I’ve written about my passion for reading and the many life skills being an English major has given me. My mom, a former first grade teacher, instilled the love of reading in me at a young age. I have fond childhood memories lying side by side on our bellies flipping through picture books and as we got older, chapter books. Books were everywhere. It was the quickest way to take a vacation, to escape, and to open the doors of my little home to the great big world. 

The studies don’t lie. Reading delivers huge benefits through all periods of your life.

Stress Reduction: reading even beats out listening to music, sipping tea, or going for a walk!

Mental Stimulation: your brain is a muscle and reading exercises it. Reading keeps your mind active and can help prevent Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

Improved Focus and Concentration: a major bonus in our busy, distracted, internet crazed world.

Lifelong Learning and Knowledge:  better equipping you for any challenges you may face in your lifetime. 

Vocabulary Expansion: making you more articulate and well spoken and a better communicator. Not to mention a better writer! 

Stronger Analytical Thinking Skills

While thinking about the impact of reading on my life, I began to think about the negative side effects of NOT reading.

The data that I found on reading and illiteracy in the US shocked me.  I believe that this topic is completely ignored and covered up.


The data:

Total percent of U.S. adults who can’t read  – 14%

Number of U.S. adults who can’t read   – 32 million

Percent of U.S. adults who read below a 5th grade reading level  –   21%

Percent of high school graduates who can’t read  –   19%

Total percent of U.S. high school graduates who will never read a book after high school  –  33%

Total percentage of college students who will never read another book after they graduate   –  42%

 Total percentage of U.S. families who did not buy a book this year  –  80%


 Are you as shocked as me? 

Even worse, many of the U.S.’s social and economic problems are directly related to illiteracy, yet very little is being done about it. As we move forward with the current educational standards (heavy testing ahem), the focus on reading is not valued. Our entire country is being threatened and the U.S.’s knowledge bank is decreasing immensely.


 The statistics below show the direct correlation between reading and success: 

• One child in four grows up not knowing how to read.

• 90% of welfare recipients are high school dropouts

• 44 million adults in the U.S. can’t read well enough to read a simple story to a child. 

• 85% of all juveniles who interface with the juvenile court system are functionally illiterate.

• More than 60% of all prison inmates are functionally illiterate.

• 2/3 of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of the 4th grade will end up in jail or on welfare.If they cannot read proficiently in the 4th grade, he or she will have approximately a 78 percent change of not catching up. 

• Penal institution records show that inmates have a 16% chance of returning to prison if they receive literacy help, as opposed to 70% who receive no help. This equates to taxpayer costs of $25,000 per year per inmate and nearly double that amount for juvenile offenders.

• Since 1983, more than 10 million Americans reached the 12th grade without having learned to read at a basic level. In the same period, more than 6 million Americans dropped out of high school altogether. 

•  Over one million children drop out of school each year, costing the nation over $240 billion in lost earnings, forgone tax revenues, and expenditures for social services.  

• Out-of-school reading habits of students has shown that even 15 minutes a day of independent reading can expose students to more than a million words of text in a year. 

• In 1999, only 53 percent of children aged 3 to 5 were read to daily by a family member. Children in families with incomes below the poverty line are less likely to be read aloud to everyday than are children in families with incomes at or above the poverty line. 

• Students who reported having all four types of reading materials (books, magazines, newspapers, encyclopedias) in their home scored, on average, higher than those who reporter having fewer reading materials. 

• Approximately 50 percent of the nation’s unemployed youth age 16-21 are functional illiterate, with virtually no prospects of obtaining good jobs. 

• 46% of America’s adults are poor readers, or “functionally illiterate.” They can’t carry out simply tasks like balancing check books, reading drug labels or writing essays for a job. 


 The fate of our country is at risk. What can you do about it?

Continue to read. Continue to discuss books. Read the book before you see the movie. Buy books. Share books. Give books as gifts. Support teachers. Support authors. Donate books to schools, to daycares, to donation centers, and to shelters.  Read to children. Have children read out loud to you. If you can, become a literacy volunteer or a tutor to adult or child students.

Most importantly Read, read, read. 

xoxo Katie

 

 

 

In Defense of the English Major

  in defense of the english major, Katie a beautiful little adventure

I was an English major in college. No, I was never a teacher, nor did I have any great works published. I simply love to read, analyze, think about, discuss, and write about literature. Being an English major forced me to think critically and abstractly on a daily basis – uncovering themes and tropes as well as applying these thought processes to myself and the world around me.

We English majors get a lot of flak. During college the first response when I informed people what I was majoring in was, “What are going to do with that?” or “That sounds like a  waste of money.” Now, 9 years later, people still ask, “Are you actually using your English degree?”, “Was your degree a waste?”, or “You’re writing, but are you getting paid?”. It’s very rude!

I chose to study literature and still love it today because literature is a study of life in all its greatest forms. You get to experience life through the eyes of the greats from all time periods and doing so heightened my awareness of the human experience.

Additionally, it has broadened my perspective and has helped me become self-aware. I know I drive Ryan and my friends crazy by over analyzing every word, every moment, and every episode of Mad Men (or even  things like pop song lyrics and The Walking Dead). I can’t shake it, it’s part of who I am.

Being an English Major not only primed me to think differently about the world – it has also provided me with valuable tools to use in the workforce. Yes, it took a couple of years to figure out how to hone these skills and use them to my advantage. I couldn’t tell you how many interviews I went to where people stared dumbly at my resume, “so…English major eh?”.

Yet, I feel the my major has allowed me to possess and master certain skills sets that make me a desirable employee in many fields.  Skills like critical thinking, analytical thinking, writing skills, interpersonal skills, synthetic thinking, lateral thinking, creativity and most importantly communication skills. If you can communicate with varying audiences effectively, you can do pretty much anything.

But my choice to be an English major had nothing to do with the skills it would equip me with for the post-graduate job force. As a bright-eyed 18-year-old, I didn’t even consider those skills. I decided to be an English major because I loved to read. Reading allowed me to become other people, to see the world through the eyes of Bronte, Hemingway, Yeats, Milton, and Joyce. It wasn’t a form of escape, it was a way to live a life outside of my own. To experience the world and meet new people outside of my small college campus.

With each piece of literature I was invited to question our society, examine our culture, and analyze the world we occupy. I learned to step behind the lens of varying perspectives and to stretch my mind while nurturing my own opinions and spirit. By doing so I became more part of the world; more human.

People may ask, “So? Why would you become an English major? Why is that so important? How does that make you valuable to the future and the workforce?”

My reply?

Can you imagine a world without literature?A world without stories, letters, poems, plays, movies, song lyrics?

What would be the purpose to life? To simply work, produce products, sell, consume, and die? That would be proposing a life without art, a life without symbolism, a life without humanity.

Civilization is built upon stories and texts and analysis of history. We learn from the past and history is written and told; why else is it called history? From these stories we learn to endure and to grow and to live.

Our existence is meant for more than simply working and producing in order to survive. We are born to create and to enjoy and to share.

I believe all students can mutually agree that they learned more about life than about earning a living during their four years at college. I am fully in support of English Majors.  I can’t think of any better major to personally equip me both mentally and spiritually for my tenure as a human on earth.
xoxo Katie

Ryan Takes Over the Blog: 5 Ways to Stay Sane in Law School (or grad school)

snow abla
The bully that is Polar Vortex came by for another nasty visit this week. The latest snow storm to pummel the North East made today and yesterday snow days!. We bundled up at home, hiding out from the 8-11 inches of snow dumped across the county. Today, we are facing a -12 windchill and I’m chilled to the bones.

While I worked from home, Ryan had a rare day of relaxation. But the man doesn’t know how to relax, instead he offered to write a guest post for me, offering some tips for adult students like himself.

So, today, I hand over the reins to my blog to my hardworking and lovable husband, Ryan. Here he is in his own words:

ryan

Hello blogging world! My name is Ryan and I’m the lucky guy that gets to call Katie my wife. Though you and I have vaguely “met” through Katie’s posts, I wanted to take a moment to formally introduce myself and discuss law school.

First, I am a part-time evening student, meaning that in addition to having a 40 hour work week, I typically spend about 3-4 nights a week attending classes at a  law school near my work. My free time is slim to none, so I’ve learned how to manage my time and divide up my hours between, work, school, sleep, and social life.   I have been doing this for 3 years now, night students have a 4 year program, and I’m begining to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Now this may appear to be a crazy schedule and you may be wondering, “why would anyone sign up for this?” However, it is manageable and I am here to discuss 5 ways of staying sane during law school, which I feel can be applied to both full-time and part-time students.

1. Have a life!

ryan life

I remember my first year Torts professor telling me that the key to success in law school was to not have a life your first year (possibly first two years for evening students). The rationale is that the first year courses are considered your core courses and potential employers, especially for summer associate positions, will look at how you did in your first year courses. Once I heard this, I couldn’t imagine devoting over a year to work and school during the week and solely school work on the weekends. I’m pretty sure that’s how people tend to go crazy. So I decided to modify his advice and have somewhat of a life during my first year. I wound up doing well in my first year courses and also managed to stay sane.

2. Devote a weekend day to yourself or to “us” if you are in a relationship.

ryan and katie

Saturday was my particular day of choice before I met Katie and now it has become our day. Saturdays have become our day to unwind, catch up on what happened during the week, and enjoy everything that life has given us.

3. Don’t be afraid about relationships and law school.

don't be afraid of relationships in law school

I believe that one could write a book solely on this topic alone. If you google “relationships and law school” you will find a slew of articles, mostly negative, about the effects of law school in relationships. Don’t get me wrong, law school is hard on any relationship, married or dating, but if both of you are willing to make sacrifices and compromises, then it will work. Katie, being the wonderful wife that she is, has made this adventure through law school much more manageable through everything that she does for me

4. Don’t be shy!

don't be shy

This one is easily said but being the very shy person that I am, I know how hard it can be to meet new people and make new friends, especially in the competitive atmosphere of law school. Still, you are all on the same boat that is law school and experiencing the same treacherous ride, so why not make new friends along the way.

5. Get a dog! (or cat if you are a cat person)

get a dog to help with law school

Seriously, this is one of the best ways to stay sane in law school. Most recently, Yale Law School began bringing in dogs around final exam time to alleviate stress from their students. I’m lucky enough to have a little shitzu poodle named Maggie May that comes to greet me at the door every night, even if it’s midnight, just to let me know how much she has missed me.

I hope others find my learned experiences. Above all else, try to not worry too much. (I can see Katie rolling her eyes as she reads this because I’m a constant worrier). But, try to add some laughter into the mix.

have fun in law school

 

Law School Widow

confessions of a law school widow

Today I am once again a Law School Widow.

Yes, that is the technical term for us women married to adult law students. Ryan heads back to Law School tonight and I go back to seeing him only on the weekends (except for Tuesday nights, which he has off!). I wrote about my experience being married to a law student back when I first started blogging. But after another semester under my belt, I’m ready to share more of the gritty details.

I knew exactly what I was signing up for. Ryan has been in law school the entire time we have been dating. To save money and to gain work experience, he works full-time at a DA’s office and then heads to classes at night. When we first started dating our life ALS (after law school) seemed so far ahead.

Now, we only have 3 more semesters (out of 8 total) left. The light at the end of the tunnel is getting brighter. We still have a lot of work ahead of ourselves after graduation though. There is studying for the bar exam, taking the bar exam (and hopefully passing), finding a job, and settling yourself in at the new position. We will probably be experiencing long hours for a long while yet.

Yes, I say “we” because when I married Ryan I vowed to make his dreams my own. We are in this together.

There are a lot of statistics out there that show how hard law school is on relationships. A large number of marriages end and spouses are left feeling compromised. They say to  imagine the normal growing pains one goes through in the first year of marriage and times that by 2. I try to ignore that hype.  And if I’m being honest, yes things can be very hard. There are fights, there are tears, there is confusion, and there is sacrifice.

I decided to pull together a con and pro list to share what life as a law school widow is truly like. I’m sure others can relate, whether you spouse or significant other is a student, in the armed forces, works long hours, or work away from home. Of course our love will always be stronger than these cons. I shouldn’t have to tell you that I admire all his dedication, passion, and work. But there are negative and this is an honest account.

cons

1. Disconnect

If I was going to give only one warning, this would be it. The disconnect is huge. Ryan and I can go 1-2 days only talking via text. Sure, texting is fast and easy but you can’t pick up on any emotional cues via text. You can’t make someone feel better after a tough day at work. You can’t share proper anger over a professor. You can’t hug or kiss or cuddle or give a look that can make the other feel instantly better.

It’s common for us to not share our daily happenings with each other. The big things, yes. But we miss out on each others daily stories about funny events or articles we may have read. Ryan doesn’t know what is happening around the house or what bills have been paid or what groceries were purchased, much less than I know what happened during his commute or how is head cold is doing.

His mistress that is law school could tell you more about his week than I can. And sometimes I simply feel ignored and he feels the same. The words, “you just can’t understand” are said frequently regarding his work load and schedule. And it is the truth.

We miss out on any connection. After a week of not sharing our lives with each other it’s hard to open up again. It’s hard to remember that funny anecdote you wanted to share on Wednesday. It’s hard to remember that this is my team-mate, that he needs me just as much as I need him. There is so much to catch up on and yet you don’t know where to begin. Life goes on whether or not you are together. It takes work to close the gap.

2. Re adjusting your social life

After a long week, we like to devote quality time on the weekends together. This gets hard because our lives are also busy with family and friends. We don’t want to turn down every invitation from others, but we do have to make time for our relationship as well. This time comes first for me because our relationship would suffer if I didn’t. It takes works and commitment. We plan special dates and weekends away and try to make our time together count. However, there are weekends where I’ll travel to see girlfriends or that he is locked up in the office all day studying. Things happen. You have to have enough faith in each other to know that we both want the best for each other.

3. High levels of stress and anxiety

Oh boy does this get bad! Like someone just threw a grenade into my living room and all hell has broken loose bad. Ryan is under a huge amount of stress at all times. And who could blame him? He worries about work, he worries about school, he worries about his TA positions, he worries about bills, he worries about the future, he worries about me and how I am with all of this. The worry spreads over to me and the gritty truth is that it’s exhausting. It gets tiring assuring that the right choice was made, that we are going to be okay, that I am dealing, that life IS good. And it is. This is a minor part of our lives. We will endure and things will continue to get better. But there are days where it feels like nothing is going your way, that you just can’t catch a break, that you just want to quit.

4. Being apart during the week

Of course this goes hand in hand with the disconnect, but on a much more minor level, I get selfish and wish Ryan was there to help with house hold chores. When he is home he’s a big help. He’s the one that always washes the dishes. He’s the one who takes out the trash. He loves to clean and I miss that oh so much during the week. I save our favorite TV shows to watch together on the weekends or a night off. I cook large meals (his lunch and dinners for the week) and get sad having to eat them alone and pack up the rest for him. Ok, enough pity party.

pros

1. Endless “me time”

Earlier this week, I wrote about how much I need quality “Me Time” and I do get a lot of that while school is in session. I can make as many friend dates as I want, spend time with my parents, go shopping, work out, or binge watch all my favorite girly TV shows and movies. I can take a 30 minute bath without guilt. I can wear my ugliest sweats and eat ice cream while watching Pretty Little Liars all week with no one to suggest other wise. I plan on making the most of this time this semester.

2. Easier to Budget

We are big in the saving mode right now – trying to pay down our credit card debt and add as much to savings. I work hard on our budget and honestly like having control of it. As the manager of our household I can be sure that we are staying in line with our financial goals and take that worry off of Ryan.

3. Ryan is following his dream

And what more could a wife wish for? I’m so happy that he doing everything he can to complete his goal. Last night he reminded me that, “no one actually ENJOYS law school”. But he’s pulling through, putting in his time. He worked full-time to put himself through undergrad and now is doing the same for law school. I’m beyond proud of him and am happy he has found a calling. Much rather have him working hard towards his dream than floundering about at home with me at a loss at what to do with his future.

tips

I have two tips for couples:

1. Communicate your expectations. Make sure you share your concerns and fears. Decide how time together will be spent. Delegate household chores and set up a communication schedule for when you are apart. Don’t hold any bitterness or grudges or they will escalate quickly. Compromises will have to be made, adjust as you learn.

2. Schedule dates This is a number one priority for us. If we don’t schedule dates we fall back onto watching TV and venting about money, bills, schedules, and time spent together. I try to support Ryan as much as I can by making life at home a vacation from Law School (when he can take it). We plan fun. Yes, money is tight, but I’d personally rather save up for a weekend trip rather than go out to eat once a week. Our marriage is not defined by law school.

law school widow

Please share your own experiences!

  xoxo Katie

 

 

 

The Thankful Project – A Job

thankful project

It is the month of Thanksgiving – a perfect time to reflect and remember all that we have to be grateful for.

I’m joining Kenzie’s The Thankful Project over at her blog Chasing Happy. Today we are discussing a job that we are thankful for.

To be honest, I’m thankful for every job that I’ve ever had. Not just because good jobs are hard to come by these days, but because they were all different and all suited me rather well.

The job that I want to discuss today though is my very first “real” job out of college. I was floundering a big after graduation. It took me a good 8 months to find a “career” job. There seemed to be zero good fits for me and my English degree, until I stumbled upon an ad for a job at an international boating magazine. After studying the company a little bit, I knew this was the job I wanted. I was ecstatic when I got an in person interview.

I was a nervous wreck and dripping in sweat under my suit. Everyone was so nice and it was a beautiful office located right on the bay. But, everyone was a passionate boater. It was their life. When they asked me about my boating experience, I choked up and looked nervously around the room. I knew if I mentioned my Pop-Pop’s small time fishing boat they would smile and think “awe isn’t that cute, that’s the type of boats we use as a dinghy”. I put on my biggest smile and said, “well, not much, but I can’t wait to learn and become a boater like the rest of you!” I couldn’t believe it when they offered me the job on the spot.

Like most other first “real” jobs I learned a lot of valuable lessons, tools, and became much more self-aware about myself. Like any job, it wasn’t perfect and I did my fair share of complaining during my time here. But in hindsight, it was pretty great. Here are a few of the things I’m thankful for the most about my 3 years in this position:

1. I learned to stand up for myself and to use my voice. When I started this job I was feeling pretty low about myself. I had done so well in college, but couldn’t find a job. While at this position I gained confidence in myself. I learned to speak out about what I like and didn’t like about my position and low and behold, a mere 6 months after starting, they created a new position for me – that better suited my passions and tool set. I learned that my voice matters. 

2. It provided me the opportunity to travel the country. Part of my job entailed traveling around to different boat shows across the country. I got to travel to some pretty spectacular coastal places in New York, Florida, California, and Washington. It was a lot of time away from home and a lot of hard work. I would never want to go back to the grueling 12 hour days of running a boat show, but I wouldn’t trade in my experience to see beautiful parts of this country on someones else’s dime. Although we worked really hard, we also enjoyed times at fun restaurants and bars. I have so many memories like the ER visit in Miami, being in San Diego for Mardi Gras, and group happy hours on the deck of boats in the San Juan islands.

3. It opened me up to new things. Through this job I became friends with people I would have never considered being friends with in college. It allowed me to see that “clicks” don’t have to exist in adult life. Before I started this job, I swore that I hated wine and I would have never tried sushi. And surprise, surprise, now I love sushi and am a major wino. I also would have never considered becoming a graphic and web designer – but while at this job I self-taught myself some basic html and Illustrator and had so much fun that I decided to go back to school for it!

4. It Made me less shy. When I first started at the young age of 22, I was basically terrified to call up strangers on the phone to talk to them about our business. But, as my three years progressed I quickly found myself as the bubbly blonde that loved welcoming and introducing our clients at events and even acted as the emcee during our Auction and Trivia nights. In hindsight, this job really helped me grow into myself.

5. It introduced me to a whole new world of people. I never knew that “boaters” were such a niche demographic of people, or that they were so fun! These people can drink! I had so much fun over the years meeting various welcoming boaters at our events. I think that was my favorite part of this job – hearing all of the amazing stories of our readers and event attendees. Most of them were devoted boating and travel enthusiasts who gave up all of their belongings and their home to live aboard their yachts and to travel the world. They had a dream and they made it come true. I found them to be inspiring and once again fun!

6. Instilled in me a good work ethic and to live by the motto, “work hard, play hard” As I mentioned above, we worked extremely hard. But, we always rewarded ourselves at the end of the day with either a night out somewhere or by having a few glasses of wine back at the hotel or office. Even though it was sometimes hard to get up the next day, we would get up, strap on our boat shoes and attack the next day. (I know for sure I wouldn’t be able to keep up now at age 30.) Even though we drove each other insane sometimes, I learned the value of team work.  Our boss would always says, “You gotta work hard to play hard.” and I remember thinking that it was so cheesy. But, it is a good motto to live by at any age. I continue to celebrate each victory while simultaneously look forward to the next step.

What is a job that you’ve had that you are thankful for?

xoxo katie